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Jargon 2017-07-29T07:21:21+00:00

Jargon

On stage, as in many areas of life, terminology is used that to a newcomer has no obvious meaning. We have compiled the list below to help people who are unfamiliar with working in the stage environment to break through and understand the jargon we use.

A two pronged device attached to the back of a piece of scenery on to which a rope can be tied.
A large piece of painted cloth which stretches the full width of the stage to represent a particular scene e.g. exterior of a house, landscape.
(The Board) A control panel located in the wings of the stage from which cues are given to the follow spot, orchestra and cast.
Familiarly known as the ‘CYC’. A sheet stretched on a frame at the back of the stage used as a projection screen for special lighting effects
The area towards the front of stage, closest to the audience.
A framework of timber covered with canvas and painted to represent a particular scene e.g. interior of a room, house or foliage.
The platform areas above the wings of the stage.
A spot light located at the back of the auditorium used to flood light a member of cast on stage.
The building of a stage set.
The dismantling of a set and removing it from the stage at the end of a run of shows.
A pair of metal plates screwed to each half of a pair of flats, the outer edges of the plates are cut and rolled to form tubes which mate together and can be held together by a hinge pin.
Used with a pair of hinge cleats to fix two flats together.
The main front of stage curtains which screen the stage area from the audience prior to and following a performance.
These are bars that are hung above the stage stretching the full width of the stage on which cloths or lighting is hung
A solid black flat or black curtain used at side of stage to mask the wings.
Numbering sequence of curtains. The number 1’s being closest to the audience
The right hand side of stage when looking out to the audience from the stage. Ofter referred to as O.P.
The left hand side of stage when looking out to the audience from the stage.
An item of high-level access equipment used to gain access to lighting bars/cloth bars. This is short for “tallescope”.
The generic term used for cloths, trucks flats.
An adjustable support mechanism used together with a stage weight to support a flat.
A heavy weight used in conjunction with a stage brace to support a flat from moving.
Either removing an item of the from the stage so that it is no longer visible to the audience, or the dismantling of a stage set at the end of a show.
Plain curtains
Usually referred to as the “scope”, it is an item of high-level access equipment used to gain access to lighting bars/cloth bars.
A long rail stretching across the width of the stage, on which a cloth is hung so that it can be pulled across the stage into position.
An item of scenery built on a mobile base.
The area towards the back of the stage furthest from the audience.
A winding mechanism used to raise and lower lighting or cloth bars.
The areas off each side of the stage not visible to the audience.
To stretch a cloth out across the stage making it visible to the audience, or to pull the cloth off stage when it has finished being used.
This is the longer name for a “Track” on which cloths are hung.

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